"What happens if Federal MP's disagree with the Speaker's ruling?"

Thanks for your question, Jessica. If a member of parliament disagrees with something that has happened, they can call a 'point of order'. This means drawing a specific standing order—rule—to the attention of the Presiding Officer (or their deputy), who chairs the meeting. The Presiding Officer then has to interpret the point of order and decide if it is valid. The Clerk sometimes assists with this because they have a detailed knowledge of the standing orders.

If a member of parliament disagrees with a ruling made by the Presiding Officer (Speaker in the House of Representatives or the President in the Senate), they can move a motion of dissent—disagreement—to be voted on all the members. Alternatively, a member of parliament can move a motion of no confidence in the Presiding Officer. Motions of these types are very unusual.

diagram to help explain What happens if Federal MP's disagree with the Speaker's ruling?