"Is there any bodies that regulate the behaviour of members of parliament? Besides media and voters"

Hi Wayne. While some states have an anti-corruption or integrity commission, there is no organisation that guides the conduct of members of the Australian Parliament. However, there are many other ways in which the behaviour of members of Parliament is scrutinised—closely examined—and regulated.

Like all Australians, members of Parliament must obey the law. If a member of Parliament has been found guilty of a serious crime or who are an undisclosed bankrupt they can be disqualified from sitting in Parliament (section 44 of the Australian Constitution).

The Standing Orders of both the Senate and House of Representatives define disorderly behaviour and how it will be dealt with in the chambers.

The Prime Minister and ministers are held to account in the Parliament. Any member of parliament can examine the the work of ministers and the government in Question Time. Ministers may also be required to attend Senate estimates hearings to explain the work of the government department they are responsible.

Each government also sets its own statement of ministerial standards. This code is controlled by the Prime Minister, not the Parliament. It is not a law or regulation and can be changed.

The media has an important role in scrutinising—closely examining—the work and behaviour of members of Parliament. 

diagram to help explain Is there any bodies that regulate the behaviour of members of parliament? Besides media and voters