"Did any women contribute to the Constitution or was it mainly aimed at men at the time it was written?"

The Australian Constitution is often described as the birth certificate of the nation and was belongs to all Australians. However, when the Constitution was written and agreed to most Australian women did not have the right to vote. Despite this, the idea of universal suffrage—all women and men having the right to vote—was supported by some of the men involved in the 1890s conventions—meetings—which wrote and debate the draft Constitution.

In 1895 South Australia gave women the right to vote and to stand for parliament. As a result, South Australian women could vote to elect other women to participate in the 1897 constitutional convention. Catherine Helen Spence stood for election to the convention but was unsuccessful. Although no women took part in any of the constitutional conventions, the records of the debates show that most men who took part thought it was inevitable that universal suffrage would be introduced early in the new Australian Parliament. The Commonwealth Franchise Act 1902 gave all women (with the exception of Aboriginal women in some states) the right to vote and stand for parliament.

You can find out more about the drafting and agreement of the Australian Constitution in this paper. 

diagram to help explain Did any women contribute to the Constitution or was it mainly aimed at men at the time it was written?