"Can the Governor-General create or change a law? If so, can they do it without the permission of the Prime Minister or the Queen?"

The Governor-General is a key part of the Australian Parliament but is unable to create or make changes to existing laws.

However, the Governor-General can suggest a change—called an amendment—to a bill—proposed law—which has already been agreed to by the Senate and House of Representatives. The bill, with their suggestion, would then be returned to the house of Parliament where it was first introduced for consideration.

The Governor-General does not need the permission of the Prime Minister, or the Queen, to suggest a change although they could discuss it with them.

The final stage in making or changing a law is when the bill receives ‘Royal Assent’. This is where the Governor-General checks and agrees to the bill in the name of the Queen. Once again, the Governor-General acts independently and does not need the permission of the Prime Minister, or the Queen, to sign the bill into law.

diagram to help explain Can the Governor-General create or change a law? If so, can they do it without the permission of the Prime Minister or the Queen?