"Apart from the standing orders, what other 'rules' does the House have to follow, specifically in Question Time? "

Hi Jessica, thanks for your question.

Standing orders are the rules used to manage the work of the House of Representatives and the Senate. Along with the Australian Constitution and customs that have developed over many years, standing orders guide the way the chambers operate each day.

Section 50 of the Constitution gives each chamber the power to make and change its own standing orders. The House of Representatives' and the Senate's standing orders are similar but not the same. Each chamber has over 200 standing orders, which include details about:

As well as standing orders, there are sessional orders which are temporary rules used to manage the work of the House. These rules are sometimes adopted as permanent rules. In the Senate they are called temporary orders.

Other documents that are used to guide the process and procedure of the chambers are known as House of Representatives Practice and Odger’s Australian Senate Practice.

diagram to help explain Apart from the standing orders, what other 'rules' does the House have to follow, specifically in Question Time?